Paget’s Disease of the Nipple

So you have heard the words “breast cancer” and may be the first time you’ve heard of “Paget’s Disease of the Nipple.” You have turned to the internet and googled “it” and here you are.  You’ve been surfing around online trying to make sense of what is happening to you, to sort it out and to put together some sort of plan. I know, I did the same thing.  That is why I started breast cancer MyStory.  It is here for you so you’d have a soft space online to land when the hard diagnosis of breast cancer hits.  Take your time to wander our site.  In all your frantic worries of the moment, don’t forget to stop and smell the flowers (thus the photo reminder to the left that I took at our community garden).

We are here for you 24/7 and you are welcome anytime.

This is from breastcancer.org:

What is Paget’s Disease of the Nipple?

“Paget’s disease of the nipple is a rare form of breast cancer in which cancer cells collect in or around the nipple. The cancer usually affects the ducts of the nipple first (small milk-carrying tubes), then spreads to the nipple surface and the areola (the dark circle of skin around the nipple). The nipple and areola often become scaly, red, itchy, and irritated.

According to the National Cancer Institute, Paget’s disease of the nipple accounts for less than 5% of all breast cancer cases in the United States. Being aware of the symptoms is important, given that more than 97% of people with Paget’s disease also have cancer, either DCIS or invasive cancer, somewhere else in the breast. The unusual changes in the nipple and areola are often the first indication that breast cancer is present.

Doctors are not yet completely sure how Paget’s disease develops. One possibility is that the cancer cells start growing inside the milk ducts within the breast and then make their way out to the nipple surface. This would appear to explain why so many people with Paget’s disease of the nipple have a second area of cancer within the breast. Another theory is that the cells of the nipple itself become cancerous. This theory would explain the small number of people who: (1) only have Paget’s disease in the nipple, or (2) have a second breast cancer that appears to be completely separate from the Paget’s disease.

Paget’s disease of the nipple is more common in women, but like other forms of breast cancer, it can also affect men. The disease usually develops after age 50. According to the National Cancer Institute, the average age of diagnosis in women is 62, and in men, 69. In this section you can read about:

One Response to “Paget’s Disease of the Nipple” Subscribe

  1. Carol October 16, 2014 at 12:46 pm #

    Looking for survivors of Pagets disease. Diagnosed with Pagets disease July 22 2014, August 11 mastectomy with the reconstruction. Looking for support groups of breast cancer survivors in my area of Southern California. Chino hills, Chino, corona. The American cancer society said they were unable to find a volunteer survivor of Pagets disease that I may speak with. Want to understand survival rates? Is there anyone with Pagets more than five years out .

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